Introduction

In 2014, the Monty Python team were reunited on stage at London’s O2 arena for the first time in over thirty years. The shows sold out, and Python were heralded in a 2014 BBC documentary as the most successful comedy group of all time. Clearly, and after nearly fifty years, Monty Python’s popularity has continued to grow. But that doesn’t tell us what people really enjoy about them. What is it that different people most remember and value about their encounters with Python (whether on television, at the cinema, on stage, or in front of the record player)?

The purpose of this project is to find out more about the different ways in which Python and their comedy have been experienced and valued over the years, by people of all ages, nationalities and walks of life. As both a life-long Python fan and a film and television studies researcher, I am intrigued by the Python-related experiences and memories of others. Whether you love them, like them, are entertained or irritated by them; whether your views on Python have changed or stayed the same; whether you first discovered them in 1969 or only recently, I’m interested in your thoughts, experiences and memories.

If you can spare the 15-20 minutes necessary to answer this questionnaire, I’d love to hear from you. Half of the questions simply involve clicking a choice. The other half ask you to put things in your own words. It is, of course, entirely up to you how much you say in response to any of these.

In return, I promise that when I have closed the questionnaire and had a bit of time to analyse your responses, I will publish the key findings (in response to the multiple choice questions) here on this website. All questionnaire responses will be anonymised in any publications that I produce based on this project, and all questionnaire responses received will be stored securely.

If you have any queries, feel free to contact me at: kte@aber.ac.uk By completing this questionnaire, you are giving your consent to take part in the Monty Python Memories Research Project, and for me to draw on your (anonymised) response in publications arising from this research. If, after completing the questionnaire, you wish to withdraw your response, feel free to let me know by contacting me at my email address.

With many thanks,

Dr Kate Egan, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Aberystwyth University, UK

To The Questionnaire